TBT: Sweet Corn and Fire (Campfire Corn Recipe)

Thanks and blessings upon the original inhabitants of this hemisphere we call America, who developed sweet corn and the delicious practice of roasting it on hot coals. Sweet corn isn't ripe in Michigan yet, but the time is coming soon! This is one of my family's favorite summer dinners. Below is a picture of campfire corn from last year, when we were entertaining guests. This year, we'll have to eat it all ourselves!

Below that is a vintage memory of fire-roasted sweet corn, from back when we had a cellar dweller roommate instead of a child.


Sweet Corn and Fire

Sweet corn season has begun!


Last night, we feasted on simple, delicious grilled corn. The ears in my garden aren't ready yet, but I found some gorgeous, fresh, juicy ears of corn at my local grocery store for 25 cents an ear. Can't beat that price!

New roommate Mr. C and I rode our bikes to the supermarket to pick them up. Mr. C towed the baby trailer that Mr. G bought for us to haul groceries in. (By the way, it was hilarious to see the looks on drivers' faces as they watched a mohawked, punk-ish dude tearing up the street, through potholes, pulling a contraption designed to contain small children. Don't worry, folks! No babies in there, just beer and food!)

Anyway, we bought the corn, and the recipe we used is as follows:

1. Slice off the silk end of each ear and shuck off about half of the husks.

2. Soak the ears in salt water for one or two hours. (We cleaned out the sink and filled it with water and salt.)

3. Build a campfire and arrange the ears of corn around the edge, nestled close to the coals, until the husks brown. Turn periodically to roast evenly. OR roast them on the grill. (We did a little of both.)

4. Shuck and eat! Our corn was so juicy and sweet that it didn't need anything at all to enhance the flavor, but you might choose to slather on some fixings. There's always good old butter and more salt. In Mexico and Guatemala, it's popular to use soft cheese or mayonnaise and chili powder. The possibilities are endless.

Buen provecho!

Comments

  1. Ooh, I miss corn so much! For some reason, it's impossible to find here in Hong Kong. At least corn on the cob. Mmmm.

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